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and 1 us have come to this area because we can walk to this area and there are business and is ago lighting designer in the area that we are working with right now on a lighting project. so there is a few other things that we have written down that i just wanted to point out there is about 60 design professionals in the western sonoma area and about 40 within the valley area and so we would like to stay, continue and continue to grow our businesses there. >>> good afternoon commissioners my name is jeffery miller with miller company architect i want to follow up on the previous speaker i have a business that has been there for 50 years and in my building there are several interior designers and lighting designers my wife is a designer who has a space had the building as well. we actually share facilities copy machines and thing like that, that we cross fertilize, it seems that we are part of the creative density of the area and having designers, landscape architects and argument connects architects and interior poem shrewded from the area i do not understand that. i have been to
to add to that? >> yes, they're called a clean circuit. you use the m.c. cable or 12-three, 12-2, the whole circuit. the computer or the microwave. >> so if you can probably do it, it sounds like putting in some kind of metal conduit-clad cable or something that will really reduce the interference. read for me what all these little things mean here. let's tip it up a little bit. >> priority a.w.g. 6-3 type s.o.o. w 600 volt sunlight and water resistant. >> which means what? >> it means it's a cord rather than a cable or wire. the cord is not to be used for permanent wiring. this is a cord that is designed for temporary power. >> it's a big cord. >> it is, it's 50 amp. >> what do they mean when they say primary? >> i don't know what it means. american wire gauge, the six is the size of the aware, the 3 is the three conductors, the type s.o.o.w., that's extra hard use cord. the w stand for wet. 600 volts is the volts it's good for and in the sun and underwater. it's 90 degrees centigrade-rated. it can run as high as 180 degrees without deterioration. this can get really hot. >> w
and day out, not only built trust between us and the afghans but it gave them the ability to prg on a daily basis. so the other frustration was the coalition effort. there was a lot of people with great intentions willing to help shared by many different countries. the frustration was many different countries, there's many different ways of doing things. so we would be out there telling the afghans, this is how you conduct police operations, this is how we do police training, this is how you hold your weapon and engage the enemy, and then several weeks later another force would come in and not that it was necessarily wrong, but it was different. so from the afghan perspective, incredibly frustrating to understand where they are going and what they need to be doing and what is right and what is wrong. so in closing if someone were to ask me from 2010 to where we're at now, is there hope i would say, yes, there is. as we stand down our combat forces and shift to an advisory and a training role i think we're going to be able to take our lessons lerbed -- learned and ensure that
stuff. complicated stuff. what could this possibly be used for? we have with us today, david green, senior electrical inspector who is a good friend of mine and a well-known sailor on the san francisco bay. you're going to sail this saturday. and mr. lloyd and mrs. lloyd. thanks for letting us come in here. really appreciate it. you're an electrical contractor, too. right? >> i'm electrical for 26 years. we do lots of big projects. we dot lots of industrial and commercial and residential. >> so you have to get a california special license. you have to be a special licensee to do electrical what is that license? >> yes. i have a c-10 licen and b license. >> b is a general contractor's license. >> yes. more interesting for me, i do a lot of c-10 for electrical. >> about three, four years ago you opened up a supply house. >> we opened e & e electric for around five years. >> you don't have so many guys out on the field any more. >> no more. i just have a lot of contractors. they come in for a lot of questions about national code. so if i understand, i tell them whatever i know. my kno
as homeless, non-lethal devices that temporarily incompass taits that is false. when use as intended they cause pain and as we have seen across the nation they pose a risk of serious jury or death. >> as you have heard today, in particular people with mental health problem are more likely to be at high risk of death, and with that high population in san francisco and coming in contact often with the san francisco police department, we don't want to run a risk of that population being impacted. and the aclu is also concerned with the civil rights implications that the supervisors spoke of today. you know, across the nation and in san francisco, you will see the african american communities of color are impacted by accessive use of force that would lead us to believe that once they are instituted they would also be disproportionately used against the xhupts of color. because they are easy to use it will increase over use and officers will be use it as the first line rather than reverting to what they used in training such as verbal commands and we also have outlined many incidents of l
incompass taits that is false. when use as intended they cause pain and as we have seen across the nation they pose a risk of serious jury or death. >> as you have heard today, in particular people with mental health problem are more likely to be at high risk of death, and with that high population in san francisco and coming in contact often with the san francisco police department, we don't want to run a risk of that population being impacted. and the aclu is also concerned with the civil rights implications that the supervisors spoke of today. you know, across the nation and in san francisco, you will see the african american communities of color are impacted by accessive use of force that would lead us to believe that once they are instituted they would also be disproportionately used against the xhupts of color. because they are easy to use it will increase over use and officers will be use it as the first line rather than reverting to what they used in training such as verbal commands and we also have outlined many incidents of litigation that have occurred... >> just some follow up
that temporarily incompass taits that is false. when use as intended they cause pain and as we have seen across the nation they pose a risk of serious jury or death. >> as you have heard today, in particular people with mental health problem are more likely to be at high risk of death, and with that high population in san francisco and coming in contact often with the san francisco police department, we don't want to run a risk of that population being impacted. and the aclu is also concerned with the civil rights implications that the supervisors spoke of today. you know, across the nation and in san francisco, you will see the african american communities of color are impacted by accessive use of force that would lead us to believe that once they are instituted they would also be disproportionately used against the xhupts of color. because they are easy to use it will increase over use and officers will be use it as the first line rather than reverting to what they used in training such as verbal commands and we also have outlined many incidents of litigation that have occurred... >> just som
you are daoeg with the mental health community i don't think that using tasers on them, unless the circumstances is the best way to go about it. >> thank you. >> >> before the next speaker i will call out a few more karls. >> wilson, miller, alicia rubin aver and cavera and perez and buller. >> thanks. >> hello, my name is gary and i am from the san francisco drug users union and my comment is going to be short and sweet. this argument over non-lethal tasers and non-lethal protection for the officers and up against the mentally ill and challenged, has been going on for years. tasers are as lethal as any gun, a gun is just as non-lethal as a tase and her if you spent half of the money that you have spent on conversation, debates ps, surveys and documentation and a little meetings like this, back into the mental health facility and the hospitals and the non-the homeless shelters and get these people off the street, these officers are going to have not have half of the problems that is where the money should be going instead of the ridiculous conversations. thank you. >> thank you
are daoeg with the mental health community i don't think that using tasers on them, unless the circumstances is the best way to go about it. >> thank you. >> >> before the next speaker i will call out a few more karls. >> wilson, miller, alicia rubin aver and cavera and perez and buller. >> thanks. >> hello, my name is gary and i am from the san francisco drug users union and my comment is going to be short and sweet. this argument over non-lethal tasers and non-lethal protection for the officers and up against the mentally ill and challenged, has been going on for years. tasers are as lethal as any gun, a gun is just as non-lethal as a tase and her if you spent half of the money that you have spent on conversation, debates ps, surveys and documentation and a little meetings like this, back into the mental health facility and the hospitals and the non-the homeless shelters and get these people off the street, these officers are going to have not have half of the problems that is where the money should be going instead of the ridiculous conversations. thank you. >> thank you, next speaker ple
the most essential part of this thing for us to be ready to fight future fires. >> colonel. >> thank you very much for allowing us to come here and participate because it is important. we really appreciate very much this opportunity. we're doing well right now but there's khal lefrpgs we can do better on and that's exactly what we're looking forward to do. we're looking forward to build upon and leverage what we're doing here. communications, that was one of the first things. it's different with our active duty forces because you see here, we send our aircraft all around the world. we can't necessarily just invest in some components in the aircraft and call it good because those assets may be gone and deployed but we have work arounds for that. we are looking forward to that as well in addition to the training. lastly is we again kind of relish the opportunity to participate in the operations against an active enemy. at least here, it's fire. we appreciate the fact we can go ahead and enter a tactical command air control. those are operations that are familiar to us and they are,
, the police assassination of vanbue and parong were nothing other an assassination and should not be used in this context, especially prolong whos family requested that the case nod not to be exploited for this. >> two, as regards commander ali assertion that a person under the influence of drugs or experiencing mental health episodes would have a greater pain tolerance, the documented science regarding that point is inconclusive what is ininclusive is the severe threat to their vital health that is posed by tasing such an individual. >> three, in portland just a few weeks ago, a settlement was reached after a september department of justice decision against the portland police for the misuse of tasers, specifically against people with mental elth issues. the plea bargain will cost 5.4 million annually including cit and including housing and treatment. and including 180 day deadline for internal affairs and a limit for complaints against the police must be heard. >> number 4 is that the lawsuits will happen. the draft policy i have read over the police draft policy multiple times and they
an assassination and should not be used in this context, especially prolong whos family requested that the case nod not to be exploited for this. >> two, as regards commander ali assertion that a person under the influence of drugs or experiencing mental health episodes would have a greater pain tolerance, the documented science regarding that point is inconclusive what is ininclusive is the severe threat to their vital health that is posed by tasing such an individual. >> three, in portland just a few weeks ago, a settlement was reached after a september department of justice decision against the portland police for the misuse of tasers, specifically against people with mental elth issues. the plea bargain will cost 5.4 million annually including cit and including housing and treatment. and including 180 day deadline for internal affairs and a limit for complaints against the police must be heard. >> number 4 is that the lawsuits will happen. the draft policy i have read over the police draft policy multiple times and they do not cover the recent ninth circuit decisions they do not cover the holes
assassination of vanbue and parong were nothing other an assassination and should not be used in this context, especially prolong whos family requested that the case nod not to be exploited for this. >> two, as regards commander ali assertion that a person under the influence of drugs or experiencing mental health episodes would have a greater pain tolerance, the documented science regarding that point is inconclusive what is ininclusive is the severe threat to their vital health that is posed by tasing such an individual. >> three, in portland just a few weeks ago, a settlement was reached after a september department of justice decision against the portland police for the misuse of tasers, specifically against people with mental elth issues. the plea bargain will cost 5.4 million annually including cit and including housing and treatment. and including 180 day deadline for internal affairs and a limit for complaints against the police must be heard. >> number 4 is that the lawsuits will happen. the draft policy i have read over the police draft policy multiple times and they do not cover th
in 1952 in the beacon hill neighborhood of seattle, washington. his parents immigrated to the u.s. from china and the 1930's. his father fought in world war ii and worked as a cook. he passed away when the mayor was 15. his mother was a seamstress and a waitress. mayor lee has five siblings, he graduated from college in maine, he also went to uc- berkeley law school and finished in 1978. he and his wife have two daughters. i also want to mention, prior to becoming mayor, one of the key points in his contributions to the community is after he completed law school, he worked as a managing attorney for the san francisco asian law caucus, where he was an advocate for affordable housing and the rights of immigrants and renters. mayor lee -- [applause] >> thank you. welcome to city hall. the people's city hall, san francisco. i want you all to note that that was such a wonderful rendition of our national anthem. please give another applause to the millennium -- melanie and her daughter. i am so excited about all of you and seen so many of you from all over our state. come to city hall anin sa
ourselves up to greater liability by use of tasers. >> let's go into public comment. >> i have a few cards that i can call moving forward. and a few let's see lisa alator. michael gos from the mental health association and mckay davis from the aclu. >> good morning, supervisors and staff, and members of the community. thanks for holding this hearing today. my name is lisa alator i, i am a resident of san francisco and i am an organizer with the coalition of homelessness and today i am proud to stand with my community members and my colleagues to say strongly that san francisco does not want tasers and san francisco does not need tasers. >> san francisco police department has been given the chance to set a national precedent in how they respond to crisis situations through the implementations of the crisis intervention team. instead of prioritizing the training and the culture shifts that are necessary to save the lives of our vulnerable populations he is offering a new weapon to be used. numerous studies shows that they are a deadly weapon that do nothing to lower fatality or police shooti
a lethal cliff and we are approaching a place where we open ourselves up to greater liability by use of tasers. >> let's go into public comment. >> i have a few cards that i can call moving forward. and a few let's see lisa alator. michael gos from the mental health association and mckay davis from the aclu. >> good morning, supervisors and staff, and members of the community. thanks for holding this hearing today. my name is lisa alator i, i am a resident of san francisco and i am an organizer with the coalition of homelessness and today i am proud to stand with my community members and my colleagues to say strongly that san francisco does not want tasers and san francisco does not need tasers. >> san francisco police department has been given the chance to set a national precedent in how they respond to crisis situations through the implementations of the crisis intervention team. instead of prioritizing the training and the culture shifts that are necessary to save the lives of our vulnerable populations he is offering a new weapon to be used. numerous studies shows that they are
>> thank you. thank you to all my house colleagues were with us today. representative don manzullo and leader mcconnell, senator feinstein, john mccain. our thanks and appreciation to mrs. bush and madame secretary for taking time to be here today and the contributions to this effort and your commitment to advancing the cause of freedom and democracy in burma. i would be remiss if i did not mention someone who's not with us today, congressman tom lantos. tom, and his wife and staff, worked so hard on behalf of burma for so many years. i wish he were here to share this moment in history with us because i think today is an amazing day. today is an incredible. who would have thought that when this bill was introduced in the house in 2008 when aung san suu kyi was under house arrest that in a few short years she would be standing or sitting with us on u.s. soil receiving this honor as a member of the burmese parliament. back then we thought about granting the metal and extension which may have been the first time a person would have received in the history of the metal the congressiona
was a member of the board of supervisors, all of us wondered why we hadn't done anything there and the mayor thought the same. >> if an earthquake happened, the building was uninhabitable. it sat there vacant for quite a while. the city decided to buy the building in 1999 for $2. we worked and looked at ways that we can utilize the building for an office building. to build an icon i can building that will house a lot of city departments. >> the san francisco public utilities commission has an important job. we provide clean, pristine public drinking water to 2.6 million people in the san francisco bay area from the hetch hetchy regional water system. with also generate clean renewable energy for city services like public buses, hospitals, schools, and much more. and finally, we collect and treat all the city's wastewater and stormwater making it safe enough to discharge into the san francisco bay and pacific ocean. >> in 2006 the puc was planning a record number of projects. >> the public utilities commission is a very infrastructure-rich organization. we're out there rebuilding the water sy
support the inflammatory flames heard on the floor of the u.s. senate used to block a u.n. treaty. a treaty meant to improve the lives of millions of disabled people around the world. hundreds of millions. the treaty is called the united nations conventions on the rights of persons with disabilities. it was modeled on the americans with disabilities act. the treaty was meant to encourage other countries to be more like the u.s. on the issue of equal rights for the disabled. also disabled americans who visit or live in other countries could potentially benefit from the u.n. treaty. 125 countries ratified it. but on tuesday, 38 u.s. republican senators voted against it. there names are right there. some of them flip-flopped at the last minute. some had signaled support for the treaty and then indicated they'd vote for it only to vote against it. one of the measure's co-sponsored, jerry mirrand, actually voted against it. so the guy who co-sponsored it voted against it. we asked him to come on the program yesterday, today as well. he declined. a former senator got involved on this as
to shirley from palm beach florida. surely come thanks for joining us on the "washington journal". >> caller: good morning. i worked in mental health services around 20 years after it raised my family and myself. twenty years of that was then ejected. in the hospitals. i suffer from depression. and i found that i have allergies. there is a book and he talks about how allergies can affect us so severely that it can cause things like depression, retardation, epilepsy and many physical ailments as well. hypertension and hyperglycemia and etc. and it is hard and people look at me like i'm crazy. and i say, look at your diet. many people believe that schizophrenia can be cured by diet? >> host: congressman? >> guest: there are a lot of things that go into this. you people have food reactions and supplements that can affect them? yes. as a cause of schizophrenia, i don't know. i don't want people to think that if only i change my diet, it will go away. there are a lot of other issues there. there are genetic issues, environmental issues, many other aspects here. working with this for 35 years, wor
is ahead. let's keep the conversation going. find us on facebook and twitter. our handle is cnn bottom line. "cnn saturday morning" continues now with the top stories we're watching. >>> from cnn world headquarters in atlanta, this is "cnn saturday morning." some are calling it the next roe v. wade or brown v. board of education. the issue the u.s. supreme court agreed to take on that will make history. >> all of those who argued for nonintervention because of the things that might happen have now happened because we failed to intervene. >>> when is enough enough? that is the question many are asking about syria, as the death toll climbs and concerns mount over chemical weapons. now some lawmakers are saying it may be too late to stop mass destruction. >>> and a toddler taken from the only parents she ever knew because of a little known federal law. now they're fighting to get her back, and may be on their way to the supreme court. i'll talk with them live. >>> good morning, everyone. i'm randi kaye. it is 10:00 on the east coast, 7:00 on the west. thanks so much for starting your day with
owners and private land owners as well as on state and cooperating with our federal agencies with the u.s. forest service. so two-fold program, vegetation management, we aggressively pursue that, but also from a public education stand point. what we find in these large scale incidents, the public is going to have to be self-sustaining and self-supporting. they need to be prepared. we try to educate them in respect that we say we'll provide the offense, you provide the defense. we talk to them about hardening their structures in a defensive measure against wild land fires. a lot of it is public education, survivability, building standards, but predominately our focus is putting the onus on the land owner, putting the onus on the private property owner, we will attempt to protect your home but the days of staying and defending your home and killing our fire fighters are done. we will not stand and defend a house that has not been prepared by a land owner and die for it. we don't do that any more. that's one of our doctrinal changes and we set forth some new guidelines with that. >>
for their members. we are looking out for you here at "money." joining us now is chuck woolery, former beloved host. you're not the host of "wheel of fortune.". >> i was at one time. i was the original host when it went on the air. you're not old enough to remember. melissa: that must be it. that's it. all right. >> 1974. melissa: i think of you as the love guy that brought everyone together. "wheel of fortune" is important as well yeah. >> i wear many hats, melissa. melissa: my mistake. i apologize. let's get on the main issue of the day though because i think this is really interesting. aarp is out there once again lobbying and you know telling seniors who are their members what is in their best interests. when you pull things back and look behind the curtain it may not be necessarily what is best for them. we saw one example of this with obamacare when they were lobbying very hard to pass obamacare. but like you have said that was not necessarily in their members best interest. how come? >> well, 93% of the their members didn't want it and they did it anyway because it was money. so it is not ab
when this was over. we'll talk about her plans now. and congressman steve latourette will join us as well. cnn "newsroom" with carol costello begins right now. >>> bragging rights, iran claims they captured a u.s. drone and issues a warning "we shall trample on the united states." >>> drunk and partying the night before he shocked the nfl and fans. >>> director kathryn bigelow talks about the controversy over her bin laden death movie. >> i think it's nice because now the film can speak for itself and i certainly have a feeling that a lot of those debates will transition to something slightly less controversial. >> the full interview straight ahead. >>> so you don't read runway ? >> no. >> before today you never heard of me. >> no. >> you have no style or sense of fashion. >> i think that depends on what your -- >> no, no, that wasn't a question. >> the devil's diplomacy. vogue editor anna wintour, u.s. ambassador? maybe. "newsroom" starts now. good morning. thank you so much for joining me. i'm carol costello. this morning iran is bragging. it claims it capture d an american dron
with the goal of helping representative residentr lives. philip came to the u.s. from hong kong when he was a teenager. he attended george washington high school and worked as a youth counselor for the mayor's office summer youth program. he was a vista volunteer with the california youth authority before joining the san francisco housing authority?hp$k in '78. he holds a banc bachelor's degre from san francisco state university. he's a member of board of directors for self-help of the elderly. pamela, earned a injuries doctor and a public law certificate from the university of san francisco school of law and became a member of the state bar of california in 2010. she chaired the student bar association diversity committee, nationally recognized with the american bar association henry j. ramsey jr. award towards advancement of diverse individuals. pamela also earned a bachelor of arts at the university of california at davis. leland reuben was born and raised in san francisco, where he first developed a strong passion for working with l÷pápñ community. he currently oversees the inten
dog is a bad driver. >> he used your car to mount a nissan sentra. the number one sign your dog is a bad driver, always taking eyes off road to lick himself. >> reporter: being trained to drive with treats is sure to have dogs heading for the closest drive-through. do you want to be the designated driver? who wants tonight designated driver tonight? >> definitely not napoleon. driving is his waterloo. jeanne moos, cnn. i said hit the brake, not eat the cake. new york. >> too funny. thanks for starting your morning with us. we've got much more ahead on "cnn saturday morning" which saturday right now. good morning, everyone. i'm randi kaye. victor blackwell is off today. it's 8:00 on the east coast, 5:00 out west. thanks for starting your day with us. we start with syria and a plan for dealing with the country's chemical weapons. president obama has threatened action if chemical weapons are used, and now we have learned that the pentagon is updating military options for the president. we'll have more on the president's red line and the military options in about ten minutes. >>> be
. if there is no further business to come before us, i wish to recognize dodi allen for the purpose of making a motion to adjourn. >> [inaudible] >> recognizing john abernathy -- don abernathy for the purpose of a second. >> [inaudible] >> all those in favor of adjournment, say aye. >> aye. >> i now turn it over to our distinguished secretary of state, alain marshall. >> thank you for a job well done. ladies and gentlemen, thank you for your service today. i want to thank the participants as well as those of you here to watch history being made. history in this historical room and people watching us across the state through modern technology, this is truly a moment to reflect upon what good citizenship is all about. before everybody does start to leave, let me remind the electorates, if i can ask you to return to your seat so we can pass those extra five. they are crucial and have to be sent to washington post case for archives and congress and everywhere else -- posthaste for our cars and congress and everyone else. thank you very much to everyone. i hope you have enjoyed yourself, making history, as
threatens to rattle the economy. after years of cutting out credit card use, why shoppers are getting back into the swipe of things. plus, could a tumble off the fiscal cliff hurt the markets? one trader says don't fall for the hype. first business starts now. you're watching first business: financial news, analysis, and today's investment ideas. good morning. it's friday, december 28th. i'm angela miles. in today's first look: watch your neck. the market is a head-turner. yesterday the dow dropped more than 100 points on word out of washington a resolution to the fiscal cliff was unlikely. but president obama returned early from vacation and is said to have a new proposal to offer congress, sparking a rally that left the dow down just 19 points. reports are swirling apple is moving production of its mac mini computers to foxconn plants in the u.s. apple may also be working on a smart watch. and, the new york stock exchange landed the most ipo for 2012. larry levin of trading advantage joins us now. larry, it feels like we are already hanging off that cliff. > > it definitely feels that wa
between us and the afghans but it gave them the ability to prg on a daily basis. so the other frustration was the coalition effort. there was a lot of people with great intentions willing to help shared by many different countries. the frustration was many different countries, there's many different ways of doing things. so we would be out there telling the afghans, this is how you conduct police operations, this is how we do police training, this is how you hold your weapon and engage the enemy, and then several weeks later another force would come in and not that it was necessarily wrong, but it was different. so from the afghan perspective, incredibly frustrating to understand where they are going and what they need to be doing and what is right and what is wrong. so in closing if someone were to ask me from 2010 to where we're at now, is there hope i would say, yes, there is. as we stand down our combat forces and shift to an advisory and a training role i think we're going to be able to take our lessons lerbed -- learned and ensure that we can continue to build on what we've don
about a week-long event and actually constructed a building and this also helps us it restore capability to wherever we are responding to. this shows a lot of different response here. this is our urban search and rescue event that was part of the overall exercise. we had a lot of different partners that responded to this rubble pile. we had urban search and rescue, u.s. coast guard, and this provided an opportunity for our military to work with the federal and state partners there in learning how to interact with their agencies and also being able to learn some of the different capabilities that they have in using their equipment. we also had some medical partners there where they were able to locate and evacuate the medical patients and that also showed a great partnership. this is the health care association for hawaii and this is the part of the agency that helped us coordinate the medical response part of this. they were able to conduct a 50-bed disaster medical assistance team hospital on the island of oahu and this allowed the state of hawaii to be able to exercise the
of their income. -- love it. we love hearing from you. send your e-mail to us. that is it to night's gerri willis report, thank you for joining us, have a great night, we'll see you tomorrow. lou: good evening, president obama working hard, to be president of all of the 47%. and big business is aligned with the president and his quest to raise taxes on everybody. here is the president today acknowledging that his promise not to raise taxes on middle class will be nul and void on january 1st. the president in his own words confirming that tax hike, coming irrespective of the fiscal cliff outcome. >> taxes are going to go up one way or the other, the key is to make taxes go up and high-end individuals, i am confident that republicans would not hold middle class taxes hostage to try to protect tax cuts for high income individuals. lou: obamacare, guarantees taxes are going up. 5 new obam obamacare-based taxeo kick in next year. a 3.8% surtax on unearned income, and call chains and dividend 18.8%, and a new tax on hospital care, and medical device manufacturersing' taxed 2.3% of the price of their pr
in libya when i used to go from time to time. he is the man that there is no limit. he witnessed the suffering under regime of gadhafi and saw brutality of gadhafi killing his own people using all type weapons. he was the first american representative to go to benghazi, my hometown. every member of the delegation came to this country. when i speak about steven they say yes, chris, we know him. he talked to the people. he meet with the people. he knows their suffering. the main thing, that he trusts them and when they rised against gadhafi, he supported them. chris, it is a great loss for libya. we lost him as a friend and man that understands the history of the people of libya before and after. chris, he built the bridge between libya and the united states. a bridge of love, of hope. we never believed one day we would be able to raise against this dictatorship. i knew chris after he came back. i knew chris more. he would come to the house and we play tennis. after the tennis we come back home and have libyan breakfast. he is a man of principles and he is serious. i agree he never
and this also helps us it restore capability to wherever we are responding to. this shows a lot of different response here. this is our urban search and rescue event that was part of the overall exercise. we had a lot of different partners that responded to this rubble pile. we had urban search and rescue, u.s. coast guard, and this provided an opportunity for our military to work with the federal and state partners there in learning how to interact with their agencies and also being able to learn some of the different capabilities that they have in using their equipment. we also had some medical partners there where they were able to locate and evacuate the medical patients and that also showed a great partnership. this is the health care association for hawaii and this is the part of the agency that helped us coordinate the medical response part of this. they were able to conduct a 50-bed disaster medical assistance team hospital on the island of oahu and this allowed the state of hawaii to be able to exercise their state-wide disaster drill. one of the things that hawaii has never been
. thank you so much. that was fantastic what you did for us. christopher stevens was obviously an extraordinary human being and contributor. every year at stanford we have a group of what we call national security fellows come. they were roughly army, navy, air force, state department. a couple weeks ago we had a meeting and the first person i called on was an army colonel. i said where were you last? he said in libya. i said did you know christopher stevens? he said everybody knew christopher stevens. he was our leader, fluent in arabic, constructive, positive, doing something, he was our leader. this spontaneous practically eruption from him. he was a foreign service officer. anybody who has served with a foreign service as i did as the secretary of state knows, what a very special group of people this is. they are very able people. dedicated. they work hard for our country. chris was extraordinary and stood out. i thought what image can i think of that might express our way of thinking about him. i thought of the great seal of our republic. i don't know how many of you have
constructed a building and this also helps us it restore capability to wherever we are responding to. this shows a lot of different response here. this is our urban search and rescue event that was part of the overall exercise. we had a lot of different partners that responded to this rubble pile. we had urban search and rescue, u.s. coast guard, and this provided an opportunity for our military to work with the federal and state partners there in learning how to interact with their agencies and also being able to learn some of the different capabilities that they have in using their equipment. we also had some medical partners there where they were able to locate and evacuate the medical patients and that also showed a great partnership. this is the health care association for hawaii and this is the part of the agency that helped us coordinate the medical response part of this. they were able to conduct a 50-bed disaster medical assistance team hospital on the island of oahu and this allowed the state of hawaii to be able to exercise their state-wide disaster drill. one of the th
a great deal of celebrate. we also have a great challenge in front of us. there are so many of our asian american friends, iranian friends, friends from the philippines, friends from our japanese-american community, are chinese-american community, waiting for the opportunity to come together to celebrate our diversity, but also to signal to our european friends, our latino france, we are ready to help lead this state. and helped change the conversation and not only celebrate diversity, but use diversity for our strength. that is our strength. i want to signal to you, let's come together, let's use this opportunity to make sure we can celebrate our strength throughout the state. i also want to welcome carmen chu. thank you for joining us. we can really celebrate and we can bring this state for because i know -- he does not want to be alone in san francisco suggesting change. nobody wants to be alone. all of us can contribute to a more positive outlook on life. guess what -- when we look at where we came from, when we look at the parents that brought us here, the generations before us, we
to negotiate with ourselves. we need to invite the president to work with us. his proposal was so outlandish, i don't think we should go back to the table until he puts something there that we can work with. the president has known about this fiscal cliff for over a year. and many of his decisions caused us to be in this position. >> how much of a problem does boehner have with other republicans potentially? >> it's a big problem. it's always been his problem. it's been a problem for the republican party since they started taking that no tax pledge 30 years ago. what is revenue increase? is closing deductions and loopholes a revenue increase? and if so, do you have to oppose that? i think what we see going on in the republican party right now is a fight between the stalwart, no new tax whatever conservatives and those who believe that they have a responsibility to keep the country from going over the fiscal cliff in the short term and in the long-term. and as jessica was pointing out earlier, the white house has a point here. if you look at public opinion polls by about a 2-1 margin, people say
lower priority. we currently keep most of our cash in a u.s. bank checking akoupt. we obviously do not keep a high cash balance it goes in from the funders and goes out to the contractors. and we do have a trustee account with deucshbank. most of which will be in trescy notes that will come to end of the year. and we will look at investment options at that time. but looking at the economic out look and what we think that interest rates may do in the future as well as cash flow needs we probably will choose investments with short maturities so we can month forward. i am happy to answer any questions. >> any questions? >> seeing none, thank you. >> is there any public comment on this item? >> none that i am aware of. >> okay. >> do you have a motion on item number 12. >> it is informational. >> i am sorry. >> at this time, we are done with our special calendars. so i will take a motion to convene and to closed session, is there a motion to do that. >> so moved. second. >> so we will at this time. convene into closed session. so we do ask the members of the public to please exit the r
is with us this afternoon and appreciate the work that he has been doing and ja -- ja king torres and the community members that stepped up and we have other members and former supervisor member dufty and cohen is out there often and you can see swing dancing in the plaza. i want to introduce to you theresa but also with theresa is a very special person. i want to introduce chef kevin so chef kevin has been incredible in helping the youth to understand the value of running a restaurant and has been working with them, and showing them how to cook basically, and i just saw chef kevin at another wonderful event, our california youth connections who work with our foster youth and donating his time and incredible jump laila and behind me i would like to introduce tammy, dominique, erin, deserie, chris, chef kevin and the leader of the pack theresa. plawz welcome old school cafe. [applause] and the mayor has presented them with a proclamation and they had time with him in his office and it was an honor to seeing the incredible youth doing what they do. they run the restaurant from th
historic building or not. this legal office use, changing the roaning or keeping the zoneling in a way that does not allow office which, is eventually what is happening is none permitted and none conforming and there is nothing that would force those business toss leave or not allow new office tenants to continue to build their space it would only impact the proposals for new development in those areas and so i want to be clear about that because there have been some comments about that issue and i want to be clear that just being a none conforming use does not mean that you would be required to leave or not operate any longer. >> right and then there is some sort of accessory expansion within the same building that you can do based based upon or no? >>> yes if you have a none conforming use, you can propose none residential -- because this is in the eastern neighborhoods and it will apply to anymore and it's basically in none conforming uses that are none residential and not office can expand up to 25% with a conditional use authorization -- that the thanks not true -- so
instances. with that being said, do i want to use weapons that are only about pain compliance or use a weapon system that is about controlling and stopping that person from doing any further aggressive behavior than what they are doing and our policy is if you look at the policy. it is not about using the policy against someone who is simply non-compliant. that would be a violation of the policy. it is about using potentially that weapon system against someone who is active, state of aggression towards the officers and or the public themselves. so, with that said, it is a weapon system that controls as opposed to uses pain as a means of acquiring compliance. >> i have a couple of follow ups, but i know that the chair has a question. >> actually this probably dove tails with his questions, but for all of us to really understand, could you explain how electronic controlled weapon, a taser works? >> it works by simply, capturing the electrical systems within your muscles and basically constricting your muscles. >> but mechanically, you fire something? >> there are two probes that
's unique, vertically challenged terrain. we are still using cars a century old >> the old cable car is the most unique thing, it's still going. it was a good design by then and is still now. if we don't do something now. it's going to be worse later. >> the cable cars are built the same as they were in the late 1800's. we use a modern machinery. we haven't changed a thing. it's just how we get there. >> it's a time consuming job. we go for the quality rather than the production. we take pride in our work and it shows in the end product. >> the california line is mostly locals. the commuters in the morning, i see a lot of the same people. we don't have as tourists. we are coming up to street to chinatown. since 1957, we are the only city in the world that runs cable cars. these cars right here are part of national parks system. in the early 1960's, they became the first roles monument. the way city spread changed with the invention of the cable car. >> people know in san francisco, first thing they think about is, let's go >> hi,. in this episode, we are featuring the romantic park
, there is a reduced pain perception in many instances. with that being said, do i want to use weapons that are only about pain compliance or use a weapon system that is about controlling and stopping that person from doing any further aggressive behavior than what they are doing and our policy is if you look at the policy. it is not about using the policy against someone who is simply non-compliant. that would be a violation of the policy. it is about using potentially that weapon system against someone who is active, state of aggression towards the officers and or the public themselves. so, with that said, it is a weapon system that controls as opposed to uses pain as a means of acquiring compliance. >> i have a couple of follow ups, but i know that the chair has a question. >> actually this probably dove tails with his questions, but for all of us to really understand, could you explain how electronic controlled weapon, a taser works? >> it works by simply, capturing the electrical systems within your muscles and basically constricting your muscles. >> but mechanically, you fire something? >> the
landscaping away and use natural native san francisco coastal plant to lament and create a place that we think is more inviting to use, more a traghtive and also, put interpretation again here about the site and possibly the silo art as well. >> thank you and can we go back to crank copark? >>> absolutely. >> love that one. that one. so i couldn't understand the differences between the initial phase alternate a and phase -- the difference --. >> so the initial so until the process of cost estimating the cost estimators estimatinged the total cost is twie million dollars but they are dealing with drawings that are very conceptual and not a whole a lot different than than general take off and is so when cost estimators look at project those details they put a 50% contingency on those costs right off the path bath and so that puts us at 33 million and top of that another 32% for detail design work the project management the construction management the resident engineer and is all of the permits necessary for it and that puts us at free million dollars and i'm hopeful that, that contingen
as a representative is how this has been politicized so quickly. >> do you dare come on my show and say i am using the slaughter of 20 little 6 and 7-year-old children? >> how many children do you have? >> joe, how many children do you have? >> i have four children, tim. answer my question. >> so do i and i refuse to let you say because you have children or anybody else that we need to actually politicize this. >> joining me now, delaware attorney general beau biden whose father vice president joe biden is leading the new task force and los angeles mayor and the current president of the u.s. conference of mayors and a member of the mayors against illegal guns and also joining the conversation is congressman john yarmouth of kentucky. stand by. the nra started the press conference. >> i welcome you here this morning for the purposes of beginning our discussion of the topic that's been on the minds of american parents across this country. that is what do we do about the tragedies of the sort that struck in newtown, connecticut to avoid such events in the future? like most americans, we were shocked
this legislation helps us keep pace. and very importantly. the legislation also allows the rewards program to target those wanted for genocide, to target those wanted for war crimes, for crimes against humanity, again, the world's human worst human rights abusers. it would be killers and the top commanders of the lord's resistance army. this group has terrorized across central africa for over two decades unspeakable crimes committed against children, amputations committed against children, taking child soldiers, taking sex slaves. in accordance with u.s. policy, a small team of u.s. troops are currently in the field helping local forces hunt this killer. . they believe an effort to could help bholser their efforts, they are asking for this, they think this can make a difference on the ground. let's answer their call and send this bill to the president for his signature and i thank my colleagues for their support. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady reserves her time they have gentleman from california is recognized. mr. berman: yes, mr. speaker, i have no further requests for time and
perception in many instances. with that being said, do i want to use weapons that are only about pain compliance or use a weapon system that is about controlling and stopping that person from doing any further aggressive behavior than what they are doing and our policy is if you look at the policy. it is not about using the policy against someone who is simply non-compliant. that would be a violation of the policy. it is about using potentially that weapon system against someone who is active, state of aggression towards the officers and or the public themselves. so, with that said, it is a weapon system that controls as opposed to uses pain as a means of acquiring compliance. >> i have a couple of follow ups, but i know that the chair has a question. >> actually this probably dove tails with his questions, but for all of us to really understand, could you explain how electronic controlled weapon, a taser works? >> it works by simply, capturing the electrical systems within your muscles and basically constricting your muscles. >> but mechanically, you fire something? >> there are two
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